How To Get Paid For Your Writing

Yes, you read right, there’s money in what you write. Whether you’re looking to make some extra money or pivot careers completely, there’s a tall tower of options available to you.


Before we get to the list of writing for pay options, there’s some things you should know first.

Here’s some fun perks to ponder:

  1. Many writing jobs are remote so if you’re looking to work from your pajamas, whip out that laptop and write away from your bed. Your “Bedside Story” could rival the “Westside Story.”

  2. Businesses are on the hunt for fresh voices, everyone is wanting new words, new perspectives, new stories and content right now so it’s the perfect time for you to pick up your pen and write. Now more than ever before the need is great for diverse writers of virtual content. If you’re gonna be addicted to social media, wouldn’t it be great to get paid for writing some of what you’re consuming?! Influencers and Instagram Creators are writing content and getting paid BIG bucks for what they’re pitching and writing into the script of their content from reels to IGTV. Big brands are paying contributors of social media content who are writing the advertising words.

  3. Writing is not the same as it was decades ago, if you think you aren’t a writer, or if you struggle to get words down, dictating them on an app or in your word processing program will do the same job in less time, and one thing we can all do is communicate (and yes, most of us can engage in a conversation a lot easier than writing).

You may already know that this is the way you want to earn some income in the months to come, but you just aren’t sure what you should write.


If this is your story, ask yourself or the people you love what you like to talk about most. Are you talking about current events in the news? If so, reach out to online news publications. If you love to read blogs, go ahead and write some that pay you. Enjoy talking about the latest fashion trends, you should connect with the brands you love about writing collaborations with them. Is reading or writing poetry your hobby? Well of course you should be writing for paid creative writing publications and contests. Once you figure out what type of writer you are, you’ll be able to go after more of that, whether that’s technical, creative, persuasive or something altogether different in style.


If you’re thinking that you would want to write for pay but don’t know where to start, check these leads out...


Job boards like Indeed and LinkedIn always have writing jobs that range from contract to full time, from technical to copywriting. Search keywords that include what you’re looking for and be sure to set alerts so that you can get email or text notifications when a writing job in the category of your search is listed. If you’re anything like me there’s certain companies you’d like to write for (maybe that’s Disney or Oprah’s publication, two of my favs), search those companies and the jobs that are posted, chances are that there’s a range of writing work that needs someone like you to complete.


Social media is a great place to find writing jobs, if you know how and where to look. On Instagram companies and entrepreneurs will post jobs in their stories or write a post about it. A writer like you can search for said information by locating job posts via hashtags. Simply search for and follow hashtags such as:

But wait, there’s more. Many of the writing jobs that I’ve located on social media came by way of Instagram Stories. Yep, a friend, business owner or corporation, or someone that loves to network as much as I do will post that they’re hiring a writer and how to inquire to apply. It’s uber cool when our social platforms feed our business and career endeavors.


Publication websites are a great way to write and get paid. Print and e-publications alike are always wanting to either find writers that will write on topics that they’ve noted on their website. On occasion, these same publications may ask that you pitch to them what you’d like to write about. Simply run a google search for “Writers Guidelines for ________,” or search for information on the “Contact Us” page. Here’s a few to get you started with publications that pay their writers:

A Short List of Writing Opportunities That Pay (and the related links that will get you started)

  1. Mystery Shopping: get paid to visit businesses and critique their service via a written report. Companies like Coyle Hospitality and Best Mark are two that I’ve worked with. Pro Tip: Never pay to be a mystery shopper.

  2. Blog Posts: Write for a blog that will pay you for your contribution. IWA Wine Blog pays guest bloggers, and so does The Change Agent, and there’s tons more that you can search for and find.

  3. Magazines and other print publications (see the links above)

  4. Social media posts as a guest contributor

  5. Know how to write grants or resumes? If so, do that and charge your friends and family a rate. And if you don’t know how but want to learn, there’s courses you can take that will set you up for the win.

  6. You can always find freelance writing work on sites like Upwork and PeoplePerHour.


Pro Tip: When it comes to writing and words, it’s all about HOW you communicate. You’ll want to express to those that are reading your pitch that you are the writer they need. You’ll essentially need to “market and sell” to them the opportunity you’re seeking and convince them that you will be their best choice. When it comes to how to approach the ones you want to write for, and what to say, here’s some tips that are sure to help.

  1. Address them professionally when you reach out to them via email or direct message.

  2. Find out who the contact is and message this person once (and please note that not receiving a reply does not mean to contact that person more than once).

  3. Be convincing, be persuasive as you write to show off that you can do this. Be okay with bragging about yourself as you speak to your ability to write about the topic their seeking writers for, or maybe you’re pitching a topic to them. If they’ve noted in the guidelines that they are open to writing topics and suggestions, go for it...pitch a proposed idea.


Other things that wouldn’t hurt to include:

  • Previous writing work/link to your portfolio

  • Social media handles and links to well written posts or blogs

  • A great resume (if you have writing experience to include)


If you really want to do this, you can. First try it out, don’t be afraid to just jump and if you are afraid, jump anyway. Start by making some extra money in this way, who knows...it could turn out to be a full-time job that brings in 5-figures a month, said the girl that’s living this dream. You truly have nothing to lose and so much to gain.


There’s no overhead for this business startup, and there’s always equity in the brilliant use of words.



Meet Yoshika Green

Yoshika Green is the Founder and Principal Writer for Yoshika Green Consulting, a boutique writing firm. She great collaborations and partnerships hence why her favorite topics to write about are entrepreneurship, her background expertise in education and the thrill of penpreneurship.


You can find her as a guest blogger or contributor for publications and blogs or forming partnerships with companies and biz owners that she connects with. She is currently in talks with Google about writing with them in the coming year, in addition to her her personal work of teaching aspiring writers and offering supportive consult and result-harnessing content.


Connect with her on Instagram @yoshikagreen, Linkedin, Facebook or via her website www.yoshikagreen.com


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